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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> u.s. missiles light the mediterranean sky and operation "odyssey dawn" is now under way. a coalition of western arab states launched the first strikes on libya. >>> french warplanes lead the assault. the allies' goal to stop moammar gadhafi from butchering his own people to stay in power. >> at this hour, some of the besieged towns including in benghazi in ruins but it's still in the hands of rebels. benghazi is right now, after days of pleading for help, they're finally getting it. the international community is responding right now with decisive effects. we want to welcome our viewers to this special edition of "the situation room." i'm wolf blitzer in washington. >> and i'm jonathan mann in atlanta. we welcome you to our continuing coverage of "target libya." it's been an extraordinary 48 hours. thursday afternoon, we saw the u.n. security council authorize the establishment of a no-fly zone over libya. and in just the last few hours, we have seen the first flights to bring that to the air. now, eight years to the day after u.s. militar
at from the u.s. navy. i'm don lemon from the cnn headquarters in atlanta. >> i'm jonathan mann. a special edition of "the situation room" with wolf blitzer is next. >>> thanks very much. french jets take off. the allied gauntlet comes down. a coalition of western and arab states launching the first strikes on libya. >> yoins in firing missiles against gadhafi's forces around misrata, to stop gadhafi from butchering his own people. >>> at this hour the besieged town of benghazi is in tatters we're told but still in the control of the rebels. after days of pleading for help they're getting it right now. the international community responding with decisive force. >>> hello to our viewers in the united states and around the world. we want to welcome you to a special edition of "the situation room." i'm wolf blitzer in washington and joined by jonathan mann in atlanta. jon, this is going to be a very ferocious fight given everything we know about moammar gadhafi, his sons, those most loyal to him. they are not going to give up really quickly. >> nearly 25 years after the u.s. attacked moammar
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
's talk about that also with retired u.s. army general george jalwan, the nato allied supreme commander. if in fact this is true that the president in recent days, maybe the past week or two, signed a covert action order, a finding, as they call it, to secretly assist the rebels who are fighting gadhafi's forces, what does that say to you? >> first of all, i have no knowledge of whether he signed a finding or not. it may be one of two things, may be an actual sort of action or it could be keep pressure on gadhafi to really feel the heat that he's feeling now with the resignation of his foreign minister and also with what i think is what is happening in london where the international community is very much united in what needs to be done. >> for all practical purposes the coalition, now nato control, they -- they have taken aside in this civil war, they want to help the rebels and see gadhafi go, even though the u.n. security council resolution didn't go that far as we all know. here's the question. if in fact the president signed a secret finding that goes way beyond what the coalition
the american navy. u.s. president obama who was in brazil for trade discussions talked about the discussion to take military action. >> the u.s. of force is not our first choice. and it's not a choice i make lightly. but we cannot stand idly by when a tyrant tells his people there will be no mercy. >> to take a look now at this map. this gives you an idea of where coalition strikes were aimed. also the areas of the no fly zone. the main areas are interest are been goes benghazi and the heart of tripoli. moammar gadhafi addressed his people and the world, saying libya will wipe out the aggressors from the united states, britain and france. >> we will be victorious, achieve victory on behalf of the people. we have allah with us. you have the devil on your side. what right have you got to attack our people? who gave you that right? who are you? you backward barbaries. this is an aggression that has no justification. this atrocity. we will hold to our land, to our rights. we will fight inch by inch. this land has been stained with t the plod of our people, our leaders, our forefathers. >> now t
>>> airport ambush. two u.s. airmen are dead, and two more wounded in germany. the suspect is now being questioned by authorities. >>> family horror. a 12-year-old colorado boy is in custody, accused of killing his parents. >>> and deadline day for pro football. the contract between the nfl players union and team owners the contract between the nfl players union and team owners expires at midnight. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. investigators in germany are trying to figure out why a gunman opened fire on a busload of u.s. airmen, killing two, and seriously wounding two others. it happened yesterday at the frankfurt airport. the suspect is an employee at that airport. charlie d'agata has the latest. >> reporter: the two u.s. airmen killed wednesday had not even made it to the battlefield. they were with 11 other military personnel on this bus outside the frankfurt, germany, airport, when the gunman opened fire. police say the suspect, 21-year-old arid uka is a citizen of kosovo, an airport employee and a devout muslim
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
by gadhafi's forces. in an interview this morning, u.s. joint chiefs chairman mike mull ensays the coalition attacks have effectively stopped that assault. and our candy crowley is talking to him on "state of the union" in an hour here on cnn. you'll be able to catch that. also a short time ago, we heard from libyan leader himself, gadhafi, who had plenty to say about the coalition strikes. >> translator: if the men were to be killed, the women will take over. we will hold the green flag high. they must know today that it is a confrontation between the libyan people and america, france, and britain. and the christian pact. all the libyans women and women are ready today to be leaders. but we will be victorious. you will be defeated. >> he also said the aggressors would never lay a hand on his land or soul. this was an audio message. it is tough to independently confirm even if we do believe it's him. we didn't see him this time. >> no, we didn't. we'll be looking at that in the hours ahead. colonel gadhafi, that gee fins we heard in the face of overnight coalition strikes and activity which
to the airport there. he is going to join us for the very latest. again two u.s. service members among those who were killed and injured in an attack there at the airport in germany. we will bring that to you in just a short time. also we want to bring you up to date on fast moving developments. the libyan military has dropped three bombs and you see it on the map, brega. the opposition may control the town managing to drive out libyan troops. that's not the only place to see military action there. military camps on the outskirts. first we want to tell you about an aerial bombing has led some to propose the united states consider imposing a no-fly zone over the country. but the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said he called this a complex operation. one of those is a uss -- you are looking here at a photo of the ship from today as it went through the canal. near the region. secretary of defense, robert gates has said the repositioning is to provide humanitarian relief and the capen't for emergency evaguations. let me tell you about the capabilities. it has the ability to transport troops,
leading the air assault on libyan air defense and assets on the ground, the u.s. will pull back and hand over command and control to someone. when? >> we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and not a matter of weeks. >> reporter: the u.s. role will then shift to providing logistical support while the uk, france, italy and other countries enforce the no-fly zone. but no one will say how long that will last. >> i wouldn't speculate in terms of length at this particular point in time. >> reporter: after all, the no-fly zone over iraq ended from the end of gulf war i to the beginning of gulf war ii, 11 years. >>> there is now growing international disagreement over the u.s.-led attacks. norway with drew its planes because it was unsure about which country was in charge. meanwhile, russian prime minister vladimir putin railed against the air strikes as outside meddling, saying it is, quote, reminiscent of a medieval call for a crusade when someone called on others to go and liberate something. >>> and be sure to stay with abc news all day as we continue our c
, however, as you noted, because even amid this crisis, the u.s. has had some contact with libyan officials and that has been critical in terms of helping to get americans and others out of the tripoli safely. so if you were to cut off all of those ties, that could put some of the remaining americans, obviously, in some jeopardy. why would the u.s. then take such a dramatic step and cut off all diplomatic ties? because that was a big deal for colonel gadhafi a few years ago when the george w. bush administration finally said he was no longer a rogue state, that they would recognize him diplomatally because he came forward with his weapons program. if all of a sudden the u.s. cut off all ties, that would he remove even more if there is a shred of legitimacy left for gadhafi and remove it once and for all. that would be the pressure point because that is something he has craved so long is have some legitimacy on the world stage. of course, given what ben is reporting and given what is happening on the ground right now, it's doubtful he has any legitimacy but the u.s. is looking for any lever
of this earthquake. it's not just the u.s., this is worldwide, because, as i said, japan is a very, very important economy. look at the japanese stock market. the nikkei, second day in a row of heavy losses. down 10.6% overnight. what typically happens, it starts in the east and moves west. hong kong, down only about 3%, though on a normal day, that's a big drop in the stock market. frankfurt, the dax, down 3.4%. the cac 40 in paris, down 2.3%. london's ftse 100, 1.3. you can see as we kent west, things started to calm down on markets. the bottom line in the united states is that japan is -- it's a big trading partner, but not as crucial as a lot of other countries like china, for instance. one of the things you'll see in the united states there will be some effect on supplies of electronics, technology equipment, computers and automobiles. the biggest export that japan has to the u.s. is automobiles. and a lot of them are auto parts. that's where you will see some of the biggest effect. as for japan itself, typically after a big disaster, you see some economic slowdown, then a build up because of
to threaten people there. the japanese government has reached out to the u.s. for nuclear advice. so, eight more experts from the nuclear regulatory commission are now on their way to japan to try to help. rob and peggy? >> emily schmidt, thank you for that report. >>> and japanese officials dealing with the nuclear crisis are, quote, freaked out. that's according to one u.s. counterpart. >> that's putting it mildly. abc's akiko fujita joins us from narita, japan. so, how are the japanese people dealing with news of the leak? >> reporter: what we're seeing out in the stores is any indication, not dealing with it very well. we've heard of panic buying, even in tokyo, which you just heard is 170 miles south of the reactor. we have heard reports of stores being sold out of radios, flashlights, candles, fuel cans. essentially any emergency materials. we've also heard of grocery stores, their shelves being cleared. keep in mind that food and water was already in short supply immediately after the quake hit. people went out to the stores to stock up. now, with reports of the explosion today, peop
of supporters in tripoli, vowing to be victorious in the end. the u.s. lost a jet there today, an older fighter jet, mechanical failure they say, and not a shootdown. both pilots are okay. but it could have ended much differently. and in the beginning stages still of this so far u.s.-led attack, a lot of people are wondering how this ends. we begin tonight with our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. jim, good evening? >> reporter: good evening, brian. for american air crews, this is about as tense as it gets. and it took more than 12 hours to safely recover both of the downed airmen. what's left of the american fighter jet was scattered across the libyan desert. the air force f-15 was on a bombing mission when it developed engine trouble. the two americans ejected as the plane went down. two marine harrier jets soon located the downed pilot not far from the wreckage, and he was flown to safety. in the process, marine officials say one of the jets dropped two bombs. another may have strafed the area with gunfire. six civilians were wounded but surprisingly bore no grudge against the americ
is set to have broadband speeds 200 times faster than the u.s. average. go to our website for more questions and answers. thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week. and i will see you next week. >>> your child gets into college. now the hard part -- how do you pay for it? we'll help you track down the money this hour. >>> and in these tough times, you might need to update your resumÉ. we've got some do's and don't's in the 4:00 p.m. eastern hour. >>> and 5:00, thousands of women take on walmart in a sex discrimination suit. it could be the most important case the u.s. supreme court hears this term. you're in the cnn news room, i'm fredricka witfield. >>> on the international front, rebel forces in libya say they are controlling two more key towns in their advance to tripoli. this is smoke hanging over the city of ras laneuf that where an opposition spokesman tells cnn government troops have pulled out of ports. both places were claimed by pro gadhafi forces at the start of the civil war. the next major city is moammar gadhafi's home town. rebel forces anticipate
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
much time. u.s. and allied warships are stationed off the coast of libya ready to launch cruise missile that would take out qaddafi's command centers and air defense network. after that, aircraft-- mostly british and french operating from bases in the mediterranean-- would enforce a no-fly zone and threaten his ground forces with air strikes if they attack the rebels. the president promised no american troops would gol into libya while one way or another, said secretary of state clinton, qaddafi has to go. >> we do believe that a final result of any negotiations would have to be the decision by colonel qaddafi to leave. >> reporter: secretary clinton will be in paris tomorrow for one last round of talks with allies. but unless qaddafi orders first a cease-fire and then a retreat, the time for talking seems to be up. tonight there is no sign qaddafi's forces are observing a cease-fire much less pulling back. in fact, one u.s. official says they are still advancing on benghazi. harry? >> smith: david, what happens if these qaddafi forces keep moving toward benghazi? >> reporter: benghazi
, water, blankets and shelter from the bitter cold. >>> the u.s. government is taking no chances with citizens and troops in japan. it is now telling all americans to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled nuclear reactor in fukushima. our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty is live at the white house with more on what they're recommending to americans that are in japan right now. hey, jill. >> hey, kiran. there's been a lot of change so let's go through it. late last night the state department announcing that they're having what's called a voluntary departure for the families of people who work in three different locations, embassies and consulate and another location in japan, so that is the u.s. embassy in tokyo, the consulate in nagoya and also the fsi, foreign service institute field school in yokohama. those people are being authorized to leave. they're not being forced or ordered to leave. it's voluntary still. state department says that it will have clarter planes available for those people to leave, 3600 if necessary. alsoer this saying those charter plan
low levels of radiation were detected on a u.s. navy ship more than 200 miles south of the nuclear facility. this as search and rescue continues in earnest, trapped four days this man rescued, one of the hardest hit areas. another team freed a 70-year-old woman found in her home, washed away by the tsunami. rare stories of success amid reports the official death toll topped 3,000. another scary moment earlier today, a 6.0 magnitude earthquake hit. we'll be monitoring the situation. diane sawyer will be live at 6:30 on "world news tonight." >>> while the situation is critical in japan experts say there are things that can be done to minimize exposure. as authorities scramble to contain reactor damage experts say science has seven ways now to treat exposure. abc's dr. richard besser talks about some possible treatment. >> reporter: eyeo dine is a very important prevention measure for radiation exposure. the reason is your thyroid gland uses iodine to make thyroid hormone, regulates a lot of functions. one of the radioactive elements released early from a plant is radioactive iodine.
clinton told the house foreign affairs committee that there quote no options off limits. should the u.s. intervene? joining me for today's two at the top is the washington correspondent for "time" magazine. it's critical for the u.s. to handle this right. if they do intervene, what is doing it the right way? >> well, they're trying to figure that out at the moment. it's been a long time since the u.s. did active mail temilitary interventions for humanitarian purposes. they did it in the 1990s after the fall of the cold war in places like somalia and vulcans. iraq in the post 9/11 era, made doing that kind of thing much harder because u.s. intervention was seen as the form of aggression. they're trying to strike a balance between the demands to launch humanitarian assistance backed by some form of u.s. military protection and broader international protection with the danger of crossing the line into what might be seen as a more aggressive military intervention into an arab country. >> the europeans have a big stake in this as well. there's a huge investment in oil fields there. there cou
of search and rescue teams. so far from australia, new zealand, south korea, and the united states. the u.s. has also sent navy ships to japan to help out with the relief. it's also helping with what president obama calls "lift capacity." heavy lifting equipment. the u.s. also sent supplies to help cool those nuclear reactors there. poland is offering to send firefighters. president medvedev of russia says his country has offered rescuers and sniffer dogs and "all possible aid." thailand is offering about $165,000 in aid. it says it will consider offering more when the extent of the damage is known. and the international red cross say they've mobilized 11 teams to the heavily damaged areas. they have tents and relief supplies ready to pass on to local red cross teams. >>> and the u.s. is sending military ships loaded with supplies and search and rescue teams to help japan, as well. let's get more on the u.s. response. elise, as i understand it, japan is leading the efforts and setting the priorities. is that what you're being told, as well? >> that's right, randi. the japanese government ha
arranged by u.s. embassy left friday morning. there is a bus on its way from sendai to tokyo right now and many will also be taking those charter flights back to the u.s. it's the first wave of american citizens who will be making their way back home out of concern for uncertainty of the nuclear threat on the ground. all of the focus on the nuclear reactor, though, has overshadowed a humanitarian crisis that continues to unfold to the north of us. the death toll now stands at more than 6,000, more than 10,000 still missing. and we're hearing some evacuation centers are still waiting for supplies a week after the earthquake hit. >> and, akiko, one of the factors of this story many people continue to worry about are the workers there around the plant, in the plant. what is the latest on them? >> reporter: well, we are learning more about the operation that's under way. we understand there's about 20 0 to 300 workers involved in this last-ditch effort. they're rotating about 50 workers at a time. we know they're sleeping in a small living room. they are running out of food. we have not le
steve. >>> japan's disaster could never happen here in the u.s. why america's top nuclear regulator will make that claim when he appears before congress this congress. >>> and gap wants to make a deal with you but the promotion ends today. go! go! completing an atm deposit in record time... that's a step forward. go! go! with deposit friendly atms, you can make ultra fast, secure deposits with no slips or envelopes. take a step forward and chase what matters. >>> traffic is going to be affected by a crash on 24 at st. stevens. 4 is backed up all the way to walnut creek. we'll keep an eye on this update. another traffic update, minutes ahead. >>> 7:15. all this morning and you know, we're focusing on the dangers and big questions around nuclear safety and what's happening with nuclear reactors and what could happen in this country. that's what congress will be talking about. alison burns has more. >> reporter: energy secretary, steve be chu, is testifying before a house commit -- steven championship, -- steven chu is testifying with and reiterated that u.s. nuclear plans are safe. b
for their response even as they go through their own political transitions. i have, therefore, approved the use of u.s. military aircraft to help move egyptians who have fled to the tunisian border to get back home to egypt. i've authorized usaid to charter other civilian aircraft to help people from other countries to find their way home, and we're supporting the efforts of international organizations to evacuate people as well. i've also directed usaid to send humanitarian assistance teams to the libyan border so they can work with the united nations, ngos, and other international partners inside libya to address the urgent needs of the libyan people. going forward, we will continue to send a clear message -- the violence must stop. moammar gadhafi has lost legitimacy to lead and he must leave. those who perpetrate violence against the libyan people will be held accountable. and the aspirations of the libyan people for freedom, democracy, and dignity must be met. >> our senior international correspondent, ben wedeman, is joining us now from eastern libya, and our white house correspondent, dan lothi
of help the united states is prepared to give. hi, chris. >> yeah, just got off the phone with u.s. forces japan saying they have not yet received a formal request from the japanese government. he also said this is a very different mission than what we're used to. he says think of haiti, things like that where we came in and jumped in and started to help. he said every step of the way has to be mapped out and approved by the japanese government. it's a technologically savvy country with a lot of pride. everything has to be formally requested before the u.s. military can act. let's take a look real quick at the map and i can show you a bit about what the u.s. is dealing with here. you can see the plant, there are helicopter crews running relief missions right around in that area. and for a second day, those u.s. helicopter crews came back with low-level contamination of radiation. they had to be soaped down and all their clothes destroyed. and they came up all clean. they're now being told some of the helicopter crews in and around this area are being told to keep their sleeves rolled down,
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
nuclear plant. >> today a team of experts from the u.s. are expected to be on hand to help monitor the damaged reactors. you can also bet they'll have one of these, a geiger counter. the bbc's david shukman explains what they can expect when they get there. >> reporter: day after day, new threats emerge at fukushima, multiple explosions, sudden rises in radiation, a scene so hazardous only 50 workers are left on site to try to bring things under control. getting hard information about the fate of the power station is proving really difficult. here's what we think is happening. reactor one, its outer building exploded on saturday. there's probably been a partial melting inside. and they're still pumping in seawater. reactor two, the most worrying, with an explosion here last night and crucially a potential breach inside it. the first possible damage to any of the reactors. it's thought that this device down below, which handles excess pressure, may have been breached. and this could be one source of leaking radiation. now, reactor three is also in trouble with an explosion of the ou
harmful than radiation in the air. here in the u.s., border agents. >> they picked up radioactive blueberries coming from russia. that system is now in place, screening over 99% of our food that comes in here. i think it's safe. >> reporter: the carrier "uss george washington" moved out of tokyo bay last week was moved further off the coast out of concern it could be exposed to too much radiation. >> t.j. winick, thank you. >>> back here in the united states, hundreds of home near denver are being threatened by wildfires burning in nearly perfect conditions. flames are being pushed by winds up to 40 miles an hour. there's plenty of dry vegetation, also very low humidity. one official even called it, quote, a recipe for a fire disaster. more crews are being added to the effort today. >>> meanwhile, salvage cruise near san francisco are trying to round up more than a dozen sailboats that washed ashore there. the boats got stuck on rocks and beaches after breaking from their morings over the weekend. cruise inspecting the boats say most will probably have to be scrapped. the coast gu
there for the u.s. dollars is $32 a bulb. >> we were inspired. we both designed a bulb and installed them here. let's see how they >>> this morning on "world news now" -- breaking news. the nuclear threat in japan forces president obama to begin american evacuations. >> and because of a meltdown risk, families of u.s. embassy employees in japan are being urged to get out. it's thursday, march 17th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good morning, everyone, i'm mike marusarz in for rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. that late development about evacuations of u.s. embassy families comes as a japanese military takes desperate steps to avoid a nuclear meltdown. can choppers with water make any difference? >>> also ahead, tough questions about nuclear safety here in the u.s. as the president stands by his plans to build more plants. >>> also, one very personal fund-raiser for tsunami and earthquake survivors in japan. a little girl's successful plan to sell her toys in order to raise money. a very sweet story. >> it is a sweet story. >>> we begin with that urgent action to
chris lawrence with a look at what role the u.s. might play in the no-fly zone. chris, live at the pentagon, what's on deck for the u.s. now that the un has passed this? >> ali, the u.s. air force has a base in italy, the navy has two, and the italians have already okayed the use of their area to launch some of the missions in this know fly zone. there was an aircraft carrier in the mediterranean sea near libya. it left earlier this week and is now out in the arabian sea. without a carrier, planes will have to fly possibly farther, which means they won't be able to spend as much time over libyan aerospace which means you may need more planes to carry out the mission. some of the officials i've spoken with here in the pentagon say don't just think of a no-fly as american fighter pilots flying american jets. there are other ways in which the u.s. can contribute. unmanned drones, for instance. the u.s. also has signal-jamming aircraft that could disrupt colonel gadhafi's ability to communicate with his forces. overall what you'll have to do is have a very clear line of command
're being honest. i think the u.s. government, because we've got folks there, also knows what's going on and need to level with us too. >> how much longer can or should the situation go on before engineers at this plant possibly give up the battle? >> i think we can't afford to give up the battle. that's the problem here. this is the cost of nuclear power. we've got to keep trying to bring this under control, because what's already a catastrophe could get even worse now. >> a new report released today, damon, shows one of the reactors may be releasing mox fuel. explain mox fuel, and does that make the situation more dire? >> it absolutely does. what's happened last august or september the japanese began a controversial experiment of using a mixed plutonium fuel in this reactor, unit number three, where we've had one of the explosions, and this is making it more dangerous to operate the reactor. if there were radioactive releases from the reactor, which we believe there are, it could make those releases far more dangerous. and it should be noted that this program of using that mox fuel
the objective and u.s. involvement in the conflict. he did defend his decision to engage u.s. military forces in that conflict. in his weekly radio address today, he touted the successes of u.s. and coalition forces saying they have both helped to knock down moammar gadhafi's air defense mechanisms as well as push back his ground forces. the president said that he had to engage in this conflict to do to save lives. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a blood bath that could destabilize an entire region, and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> reporter: but the president is facing mounting criticisms from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who say there is a lack of congressional involvement in setting up u.s. policy in libya. and the president held a conference call with congressional leaders yesterday, trying to add
-fire declared on friday. u.s. joint chiefs chairman mike mullen says the u.n.'s no-fly zone is now in place. allied air strikes have done major damage according to another u.s. official. coalition planes are now patrolling the area to deter air attacks on civilians. the u.s., france and great britain have taken big roles in "operation odyssey dawn." italy, canada, spain, belgium, denmark, norway and qatar are also involved. >>> and cnn's nic robertson broke the news of the attack on gadhafi's compound. and we want to play what he and his crew captured on videotape without talking over it, and nic will update us on the other side. take a look. >> 10:30? 10:30. yeah. and those pictures from our nic robertson simply amazing. let's go to him now. nic? >> reporter: don, we were taken into moammar gadhafi's palace compound, a large secure area a couple of square miles. we were taken to a building, we could see the roof had been smashed, two big holes punched in it. we were told by cruise missiles. in fact, we were given some parts that were taken out of the building while we were there. this is a
received the first full face transplant in u.s. history. >> now, this is a procedure that will give a dad his face and also his life back. wcbb reports but we do want to warn you, there are some graphic images in this report. >> reporter: dallas wiens arrived at brigham women's hospital ready to make medical history. last week the 25-year-old became the recipient of first full facial transplant in the u.s. >> to see a face there now after the way he was before, but he looks great. >> reporter: in 2008 the texas man was electrocuted and severely burned after a cherry picker he was working in hit a live wire. the surgery took 15 hours and required a team of 30 doctors and nurses to attach an anonymous donor's nose, lips, facial skin, muscles, nerves and bones. >> he's a perfectly normal man from neck down. and his missing face and everything that brings that to life, so i think it will give him a new chance to reintegrate with his daughter, to be able to live a fulfilling life. >> reporter: wiens was blinded in the accident and remains so. a major goal of the surgery
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
, and it was a much smaller earthquake, it was estimated around 13 trillion yen which is about $140 billion u.s., and so the question now has to be asked, especially as we look at the damage here at first light of these live pictures from our affiliate nhk, we have to start asking not only the economic losses but, okay, more seriously, what will be the human toll in all of this. the death toll now standing at 188 people, but, of course, that will surely rise as the search crews begin to fan out amongst all the devastation and destruction and try and find those people who survived this, wolf. >> stand by for a moment because kyung lah, our correspondent in tokyo, is now joining us. i know you've had an unbelievably difficult day today, but where are you now and exactly what's going on? >> reporter: i'm about 150 miles south of the region that's been hardest hit, that sendai region where we've seen that tsunami come across and devastate all those agricultural plains, the airport, the town. what we're heading to and trying to understand now that it's daylight is how extensive is this -- is this. w
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
the american people what the u.s. role is in this mission. plenty of confusion right now on that front. >>> in japan, water with radiation levels 100,000 times the norm. and fears that some of it might be in the pacific ocean. >>> in libya, rebel forces are marching toward the capital. and after a weekend of key victories, the most pivotal fight may now be under way. cnn's resa is in libya where rebels seem to have seized the momentum. first off why the turnaround? >> i'm sorry, carol, i couldn't hear you. >> i just asked you why the turnaround for the libyan rebels? >> well, i think it had a lot to do with the air strikes. the coalition air strikes that started saturday. and there's no question that the momentum has shifted. i don't think too many people could have predicted in a matter of three days, these opposition forces would gain about 200 miles in territory and capture about five key cities. but that's exactly what has happened. the latest town to go into the habds of opposition forces, the town of ben jawad. and i think this surge, this shift in momentum started on saturday wi
developments on two big stories. is the u.s. preparing to bomb libya? the u.n.'s major decision to protect libyan civilians from the gadhafi regime. >>> and also the race to stop a nuclear disaster in japan. today's desperate emergency action to stop an all outright meltdown. it is friday, march 18th. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. >>> military action against libya could happen in just a matter of hours. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's son interviewed exclusively with abc news is now responding and is as defiant as ever. >>> and as nuclear crisis escalates in japan, the west coast of the united states is now on alert already monitoring radiation levels there. >> it's funny, too, because they say they have those monitors up already. in seattle, your hometown, will be the first place to know if a wave does hit us. >> and the epa will be watching that closely. that's for sure. >>> we do begin with the dramatic decision to take military action in libya. the u.n. security council voted just hours ago. >> and now the u.s., france, britain and other countries ar
report to the threat of u.s. mainland. five states are under either tsunami warnings or watches. and later we'll talk to fema director craig fugate. he joins us. >>> also ahead, this is the week the presidential race actually got off the ground. if it were an airplane, we'd actually say it's actually took off. we'll talk to former senator rick santorum, who became the first semi-candidate to visit iowa, new hampshire, and south carolina all in one week. >>> but first, a look ahead at the president's schedule today. and mike viqueira previewed it, 11:15 news conference. you're watching "the daily rundown" on msnbc. ith back pain. and a choice. take advil now... and maybe up to 4 in a day. or, choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. smart move. ♪ [ lane ] here's the trouble with most anti-wrinkle creams. the cream disappears but your wrinkles don't. ♪ introducing neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair. it has the fastest retinol formula available. in fact, it's clinically proven to smooth wrinkles in just one week. so all you have to do is sit back and watch your wrinkles
. a u.s. crew, we saw the japanese military search and rescue. we saw smaller helicopters that could have been aid but it's hard to tell. there was a lot of activity in the air. we saw military trucks as well taking what seemed to be aid to different areas. what we did see, further off the port area was a huge plume of black smoke. it appears there's a chemical on fire at some kind of factory. that was giving off a lot of black smoke. that didn't seem to be under control by the time we left after the third tsunami warning. >> thank you, paula. >>> much of the sound is evident in the surveillance video. take a look at these. this video is amazing to see as the tsunami washes over homes and buildings carrying debris well inland. evidence of the power behind the waves. more evidence of the tsunami washing over japan. hard to imagine anyone being able to survive such a force of nature. >>> was there a moment or a thing that triggered the tsunami? reynolds wolf is standing by with the science behind it. >> we are going take you step-by-step in how they occur and what might be ahead for th
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
will convene the latest hearing on islamic radicalization in the u.s. six witnesses will testify at this hearing that will be live on c-span3. three members of congress will be testifying, including one of two muslims in the congress, dingell, and frank wolf, a republican from virginia. what is your reaction to this hearing? we want to discuss it this morning on the "washington journal." as we go through the newspapers. host: we have set aside our fourth line this morning on the "washington journal" for muslims in the u.s. we will begin taking those phone calls in just a moment. first, we want to get an update on what is going on in the congress when it comes to money. here is the headline in yesterday's "washington times." "senators hail defeat of rival spending cuts." joining us on the line is david hawkins. what happened yesterday in the senate and what happens next? guest: yesterday in the senate, the senate was asked to vote on two competing versions of legislation to cut money for the rest of this fiscal year, which only last until september 30. the republican option, the b
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
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